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Old March 11th, 2010, 07:53 PM
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Colin K Colin K is offline
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Default Getting a 35mm SLR....worth using it to learn technique?

I am getting an older Minolta 35mm from my uncle. It has 3 different lenses with it, one going up to 210mm, along with some filters.

I know everyone is switching to DSLR and I eventually want to get to that level as well, but cost is prohibiting that move right now.

In any case, is it worth it to use the 35mm to practice some good shooting technique?
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Old March 11th, 2010, 07:55 PM
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You'll learn photography from an analog camera. You'll learn computer programing from a DSLR. Nuff said.
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Old March 11th, 2010, 07:59 PM
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Yeah, what he said!

When you hit the shutter button it'll shoot on an "analog" camera, in focus or not. On a DSLR, if the setting isn't just right and you hit the shutter button, the DSLR will go, huh? And you missed your shot. Booo.
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Old March 12th, 2010, 11:58 AM
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You can learn technique with it, but the cost of film, processing and printing to evaluate your progress is money you could put towards a DSLR. You'll just be delaying the inevitable...

I wouldn't turn it down though. I have a collection of "old" cameras - Brownies, Polaroids, TLRs, 8mm video, an old Leica and a 110 format thing. Now I've added my old 35mm SLR to the collection.
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Old March 12th, 2010, 05:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David F. Brown View Post
You'll learn photography from an analog camera. You'll learn computer programing from a DSLR. Nuff said.
Great advice....thanks Dave!

Last edited by David F. Brown; March 12th, 2010 at 11:12 PM.
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Old March 12th, 2010, 11:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colin K View Post
Great advice....thanks Dave!

Just look at the lens on a wet film camera and then compare it to the lens on a DSLR. There are no marks on the DSLR lens. It would be nice to know where the hyperfocal distance is or what the depth of field is. Because of DSLRs, there are fewer photographers and more camera aimers today.
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Old March 13th, 2010, 12:46 AM
"Crazy" Don Flynn "Crazy" Don Flynn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David F. Brown View Post
Just look at the lens on a wet film camera and then compare it to the lens on a DSLR. There are no marks on the DSLR lens. It would be nice to know where the hyperfocal distance is or what the depth of field is. Because of DSLRs, there are fewer photographers and more camera aimers today.
There's alot of truth in that statement.

The one thing to keep in mind with film is since you have to pay for film and processing you tend to learn to THINK before you press the shutter....digital I see too many people pressing the shutter release and blazing away...then fixing things in the computer.

You'll learn photography with a real film camera...
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Old April 16th, 2011, 11:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colin K View Post
I am getting an older Minolta 35mm from my uncle. It has 3 different lenses with it, one going up to 210mm, along with some filters.

I know everyone is switching to DSLR and I eventually want to get to that level as well, but cost is prohibiting that move right now.

In any case, is it worth it to use the 35mm to practice some good shooting technique?
Hi Colin ... Ray here. DSLRs still have a MANUAL button alongside the A, S, P and little picture buttons. You can still shoot on manual and intentionally overexpose or under expose your picture, and learn about depth of field what F 16, f 8 and f2 mean without burning up valuable film and processing. I now love and trust autofocus, partially because I am not 25 anymore. All the chaps here have given good advice, just my two cents worth.
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