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  #1  
Unread January 6th, 2010, 05:59 PM
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Default Scribing - a quick tutorial

Gentlemen,

I was recently asked how I used liquid cement and steel wool when I scribed panel lines.

Hopefully, this step by step tutorial will help some of get nice clean panel lines after scribing.

The first thing you need are tools. Every modeler has there favorite scriber, but for me, it is the Tamiya Scriber produced by Olfa. Of all of the scribers I have tried, this one (for me) gives the best results.

Other items I use are a good straight edge (in my case a 6" metal rule) or Dymo tape to help guide your cuts. 0000 steel wool, 150 fine grit sanding pads (both purchased from Home Depot in the paint department), Testors liquid cement and a size 0 fine tip paint brush.



Step 2: Identify where you need to scribe and determine the best way to guide your cut. In some cases, like in my example below, a straight edge held in place by hand will work perfectly. These were short straight cuts on a relatively flat surface, so nothing else was needed.



Step 3: Using a guide, carefully scribe your lines. Be sure to go slow and light on the first cut. This will help getting the cut straight, as well as preventing you from cutting too deep on the first pass. If the line is straight, you can then go back as many times as necessary to get the new panel line the depth it needs to be (consistent with other panel lines made, or already on the model).



Step 4: Check your work. Once the cuts are made, go over your work to ensure all of the lines are as close as possible to each other in both depth and width.



Step 5: Most scribers will leave small ridges on both sides of the cut that could affect the overall look if not addressed. A few years ago I found some small sanding pads at Home Depot. These pads are 150 fine grit and about 5 x 6 x 1/4 inches. They are excellent and if taken care of, will last a long time. I've had the tan one shown below for about 3 years and it still works perfectly. It is soft enough to conform to curves so it won't leave a flat spot when sanding areas like the spine of an aircraft.

Anyway, gently sand the area where you made the cuts to remove any raised ridges along the edges.



Step 6: The scribed line will fill with sanding dust and the area will appear smooth when the ridges are completely gone.



Step 7: Here is the first use of the 0000 steel wool. Simply take one of the pads and go over the entire area to remove all of the sanding dust from the cuts. The steel wool will also smooth out and polish the area, removing most of the sanding marks made with the sanding pad.



Step 8: The area after treatment with the steel wool. Ensure you get 0000 super fine as any other grit will do more harm than good.



Step 9: Once the sanding dust is removed, I take a fine tip brush (size 0) and 'paint' each cut with Testors liquid cement. This melts and smooths out any burrs inside the lines that may not have been cleaned with the steel wool. Don't let capillary action take the cement into the cuts, 'paint' them, but don't use too much as this can damage the surrounding plastic.



Step 10: Allow the cement to dry for at least 10 minutes after it is 'painted' on.



Step 11: After the cement has dried for a few minutes, go over the area one more time with the steel wool. This will clean up and remove the excess cement along the edges of the cuts and again, smooth everything out.



Step 12: Once that is done, I like to go over the whole area with a Micro-Fiber Cloth. These can be found in the automotive sections in most Target or Wal-Mart stores, usually with the car wash items. The Micro-Fiber Cloth will remove any remaining sanding dust, as well as any steel wool particles that may still be on the model.



Step 13: And that is pretty much it. When all is said and done, you will have a nice clean fuselage or wing with nicely scribed panel lines that hopefully are all the same tolerance!
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  #2  
Unread January 6th, 2010, 08:05 PM
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Re-scribing lost panel lines is one one of my weak spots as a modeler. Excellent tutorial.

Can you recommend a good source for Dymo tape?

Mark
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Unread January 6th, 2010, 09:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rampage55 View Post
Re-scribing lost panel lines is one one of my weak spots as a modeler. Excellent tutorial.

Can you recommend a good source for Dymo tape?

Mark
I can still get Dymo tape at my local office supply (think Staples, Office Depot). There may be cheaper places, but it's on the shelf at both locations near me.
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Unread January 6th, 2010, 09:34 PM
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Mark-

Don't know where you are, but I can find it pretty reasonable (about 5 bucks for 3 rolls...lasts me forever) at Fred Meyer's here in town.

Dave-

Thank you so much! That will help immensely. The biggest weak point for me is scribing panel lines, and I think that this (and the Tamiya scriber I just ordered from Spruebrothers) will help me out a lot!

One question for you. I don't have access to the jars of liquid cement like that. Will the cement that comes in the Testors squeeze aplicator (black with a needle-like thing sticking out of it) work, or would Tenax or laquer thinner do the same thing?

Aaron
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Unread January 6th, 2010, 09:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by strikeeagle801 View Post
Dave-

Thank you so much! That will help immensely. The biggest weak point for me is scribing panel lines, and I think that this (and the Tamiya scriber I just ordered from Spruebrothers) will help me out a lot!

One question for you. I don't have access to the jars of liquid cement like that. Will the cement that comes in the Testors squeeze aplicator (black with a needle-like thing sticking out of it) work, or would Tenax or laquer thinner do the same thing?

Aaron
My pleasure, glad it helped.

Of the three you listed, I would use Tenax. Do you have a Michael's Craft store in your area? Most carry Testors paints (the one's out here do anyway) and the liquid cement.
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Unread January 6th, 2010, 10:03 PM
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Yeah, there's one in Yakima (about 40 miles from here) and I think we are going down there this weekend. I'll pick some up. Thank's again Dave.

Aaron
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Unread January 7th, 2010, 04:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by warthoglvr View Post
I can still get Dymo tape at my local office supply (think Staples, Office Depot). There may be cheaper places, but it's on the shelf at both locations near me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by strikeeagle801 View Post
Mark-
Don't know where you are, but I can find it pretty reasonable (about 5 bucks for 3 rolls...lasts me forever) at Fred Meyer's here in town.
Thanks gentleman!...
I was able to find some at Staples, it cost me 7 bucks for one roll though...

But if it helps me get this scribing thing sorted out it'll be worth it.

Mark
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Unread January 7th, 2010, 08:43 PM
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nice stuff Dave! never thought to us steel wool to cleanup the dust and ridges! great idea.

Semper Fi
Dan
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  #9  
Unread January 7th, 2010, 10:26 PM
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Great post Dave! I was wondering if you've tried a scriber from Bare-Metal or Squadron, I believe both are designed the same. I see you using a Tamiya scriber and was curious how it compared to the other two types. I use the scriber from BM, along with a carbide scriber, and was considering buying one like you have. My scribing can be less than desireable sometimes and I would love to blame it on the tool, but we all know how that goes.
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  #10  
Unread January 8th, 2010, 08:44 AM
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Dave

Thanks for this tutorial, especially the photos. As they say, a picture is worth a 1000 words. I have been scribing for many years now and I did all your steps except the glue in the line part. I have read about that of course but I figured I did not need to do that. After seeing your results, in photos, I think I will definitely have to add that step.

Thanks again.

Cheers
Chris
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  #11  
Unread January 8th, 2010, 12:13 PM
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Thanks for sharing Dave. I have pretty much done the same thing, except using the steel wool. I have used white scotchbrite in its place....but I may take a trip to Home Depot for some of that and those sanding pads.
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Unread January 8th, 2010, 02:52 PM
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Awesome guide!!! Thanks for posting.

After reading this, I may just one day have the guts to start rescribing the Tamiya Tomcat!!!
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  #13  
Unread January 9th, 2010, 01:14 PM
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Good stuff! This post needs to be penned, so it doesn't fade into oblivion!
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  #14  
Unread January 9th, 2010, 07:21 PM
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Yeah I agree, this one needs to be pinned up so it doesn't get lost.

Emil
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  #15  
Unread January 9th, 2010, 09:56 PM
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For you guys....anything. Thread is now pinned.
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  #16  
Unread January 10th, 2010, 01:48 PM
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not to be an internet spelling nazi, but it struck me how much one letter could change the meaning of a sentence. For example:

Quote:
Originally Posted by RJ Tucker View Post
Good stuff! This post needs to be panned, so it doesn't fade into oblivion!
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJ Tucker View Post
Good stuff! This post needs to be penned, so it doesn't fade into oblivion!
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJ Tucker View Post
Good stuff! This post needs to be pinned, so it doesn't fade into oblivion!
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJ Tucker View Post
Good stuff! This post needs to be punned, so it doesn't fade into oblivion!


great post Dave.
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  #17  
Unread February 10th, 2010, 04:09 PM
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Hey Dave, loved the tutorial. I had a quick question. Using the 0000 steel wool to clean up. I seem to kick up a lot of airborne particles of the steel wool and plastic dust. It was hanging around in the room days after the clean up. I ended up moving my air cleaner into the room to fix the problem. Have you had any problems with particles? Thanks again.

Lenny
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  #18  
Unread February 12th, 2010, 06:22 AM
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As an alternative to steel wool, you may be able to use 3200 grit micromesh cloth - used wet (as always with micromesh cloths).

Jens
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  #19  
Unread March 8th, 2010, 04:38 PM
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Does anyone know of any solution to scribing in filler. I have a step that I needed to fill with putty. Scribing in the dried putty produces a jagged edge. Thanks!
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  #20  
Unread March 9th, 2010, 01:05 PM
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Quote:
Does anyone know of any solution to scribing in filler. I have a step that I needed to fill with putty. Scribing in the dried putty produces a jagged edge. Thanks!
If you have to scribe over filler, I find that it is best to use something hard like CA or epoxy putty as your filler. Then, scribe over it with a fine razor saw (i.e. the JLC saw), otherwise you will usually get a jagged edge. That is what I do anyway. Somebody else may have another method though.

Cheers,
-Doug
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