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  #21  
Old January 8th, 2014, 08:13 PM
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Yup, looking even awesomer every time you add to this thread!!

Have played with my 48th Scale CH-47C on my time off, and can only imagine how big this beast is going to get in 35th!

Good to get some clarification on where the CC parts go, will make things easier!

(Still waiting for the conversion tho, mind you, just went away for another month of work!)

Cheers
H.
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  #22  
Old January 17th, 2014, 11:40 PM
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Just learned yesterday that MY kit is on the way, now my stupid shift just have to end!
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  #23  
Old January 24th, 2014, 09:29 AM
Floyd S. Werner, Jr. Floyd S. Werner, Jr. is offline
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Update 10-The interior
After cleaning up the roof to remove the molded on detail it was time to add the Cobra Company framing set. I donít think this set is available anymore. I did this process without the aft portion attached to the fuselage. It just made it easier to handle. I just followed the instructions to get the vertical parts in place. I elected to cut the parts in half as it would be easier to deal with. This required me to fill the small gap between the cuts. Here is what it looks like with the parts installed. I used styrene plugs to cover the joins. Most are from the backside but the first two are on both the front and backside as they are seen both ways.



Before I installed the horizontal supports for the seats and anything else I thought it was time to add the aft pylon to the fuselage. This wasnít difficult as long as you take your time and make sure the fit is good. I flat sanded the ends to make sure they fit well. Then it was a matter of clamping and gluing the parts together. There was very little need for filler.

Here are the frames after the front and back have been joined.


And just to make sure that it all fits properly and to motivate me I taped the fuselage halves together.


Now I thought was a good time to add the external fuel tanks. I knew I had to support the weight of them and the model. The tanks are unfortunately heavy because of the shape and casting. Test fitting them revealed a slight problem. The tanks are slightly short. It is important to align the tanks properly at the front and at the rear round window. Here is what I mean.


If you align the front the window is off. Iím not going to say it is blank mm short as your mileage may vary do to the sanding of the fuselage halves. Either way, I came up with a relatively easy fix. I cut the fuel tank in half. Aft of the pump assembly, which while Iím thinking about it, Iím sorry there is a bubble there. It is on everyoneís copy. Mine included. It is a limitation in the molding process. You will have to repair it. Sorry. Anyhow back to the cut. I used a saw and separated the pieces.


Once the tank was in two pieces I simply added styrene to get it to the proper length. I used some clamps and a BAF (big a* file). My BAF is very straight so I simply clamped it to file. This made sure that there was no twist in the tank and that they were aligned along the bottom, which in theory should align everything. While the tank was attached to the file I put a horizontal support on the backside of the tank. There is plenty of room and youíll never see it so you donít have to be especially neat. I then drilled four holes for wire support, two in front and two aft of the cut. This held everything in place. Then it was as any other seam, filler, sand and repeat. If you do it properly it should look like this.


Then it is just a matter of checking the size against the model.

Getting the tank to attach to the fuselage is pretty easy. I drilled four holes in inconspicuous spots, two below the floor line and then some mid fuselage that you probably wonít be able to see. Youíll note the aft most ones are near the bulkheads. This will hide it from the back and will allow me to add stuff (seats or gear) to cover the holes.





I attached the wire through the holes and attached the studs with epoxy. I let it dry overnight and then Iíll go back in with super glue and Apoxy Sculpt and fair the tank in. Repeat for the other side.

It is starting to look like a behemoth that it is. This ainít your fatherís Chinook anymore.
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  #24  
Old January 25th, 2014, 04:27 AM
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looking good floyd..

Andy
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  #25  
Old February 9th, 2014, 01:40 PM
Floyd S. Werner, Jr. Floyd S. Werner, Jr. is offline
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Update 11- Sit down but still not happy
I had the framework in and now it was time to put some seats down. I had the Cobra Company resin seats and the Eduard photo etch ones. I liked them both but finally decided on the Eduard ones. Folding them was easy enough with a Small Tool Company Folding Tool. Here are some photos of the seats.



Test fitting the seats to the floor


There are more sets coming but I wanted to get a Ďfeelí of how they would look


Well after getting the interior framing in there and talking with some Night Stalkers they informed me that there was always insulation in the cabin. So now what to do? So I took to drinking. Then after literally dreaming about how to accomplish this for two nights, the drinking hit me. Martini & Rossi Asti Spumante has foil around their bottles and it looks like a quilt pattern on it. BINGO! In a drunken and sleep deprived state of mind I concocted how to make this happen, but I better test it before I screw the model up.

I was never real happy with the avionics shelf as had been pointed out on ARC, that is normally covered with insulation blankets. I tore out the shelves as they would no longer be used and covered the area with plastic card and foil. I figured if it worked on the plastic card it would work the other way. Just in case I screwed up too bad I could always get another one from my other kit. Thank God, I liked it. I did find out after gluing it in place that I should have left the shelves in and rolled the insulation down to reveal the avionics. Oh well live and learn. It is staying like this, but you can do whatever you like.




Now it was time to see if the ceiling and side walls could be covered in insulation. The framework would work to my advantage and provide the mounts for the insulation. Since I would now have relief in the cabin I needed to make up the area where the first aid kits and the ramp controls would be positioned. The insulation attaches to them so they needed to be thicker than normal. I scratch built a couple of rectangular boxes out of .030 x .100 plastic strip. Then just attached and glued them in place. Here you can see the resulting areas.


The insulation itself is easy enough. First use tracing paper and measure and cut to the shape that you need between the frames. I broke it down into an upper and a lower insulation blankets. It looked right to me. Once the shape is good on the paper then double sided tape was added to it and on top of that the bottle foil was added. Make sure to orient the pattern the same on all the blankets. Attach them the blankets with super glue. VIOLA! I tried to not use an area with the name or stamp on it but there are some places where I said f it. It is in the middle and damn near impossible to tell. My liver can only do so much work. Another benefit of the insulation was that any holes I made for the fuel cell mounts were now covered with no additional filling.


Now that I had a sandwich it was time to fit the first pieces. Here they are installed with a first aid kit just sitting in position to see if it would look right. I'm very happy that it does, at least to me anyhow.


Another essential part would be that the insulation fits around the windows. You will have to glue in the windows now. Make sure you use the correct windows for the aircraft you are building. Normally, and I hate to use that with TF160th aircraft, the first two windows are flat, then the aft round window is the bulged type, followed by the rectangular one. I cut a piece of the foil and did not do the sandwich, maybe I should have, but with just the foil rolled around something of suitable size (15mm). I placed it in place and when I was happy with the set up I used white glue to hold it in place. Perfect. Well perfect to my mindís eye. The rectangular widow presented the most unique challenge as the insulation blanket flares out to meet the framework on the kit tail. Nothing too bad. I used four pieces and cut them tapered then bent to fit. I was really happy.


Now it was just a matter of doing the entire side. Here is the right side as I still have to do the left one. You get the idea though. Any stuff that was longer on the bottom I trimmed with a brand new blade.




It is now time to do the left side the same way. Once Iím done with the left side, I will add .010 plastic Ďdotsí that are used to attach the blankets. Iíll also add some removable panels of insulation. Those are just scabbed on the existing blankets.

The Live Resin pieces should be here by the time I finish the insulation and then things will be progressing quickly. Iíll have to prime and paint the interior shortly after working with the Live Resin gun mounts. Donít forget to mask the windows first, that could be disastrous. Weíll start dealing with more of the MH-47 conversion soon. Things like the weather radar boom and the in-flight refueling boom will cause me some more sleepless nights. Stay tuned.
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  #26  
Old February 9th, 2014, 02:01 PM
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This is great Floyd. I was wondering what you were going to do for the insulation. I saw one guy use sheets of miliput, but that's gotta get heavy and stress the landing gear I would think.
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  #27  
Old March 31st, 2014, 10:30 AM
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Default Live Resin weapons for Chinook

Live Resin offer CH-47 Chinook weapons and mounts for Floyd project and all others 1/35 CH-47
You can order right now http://models-hobby.com/?p=3
Best prices, every day shipping

LRE35168 CH47 Chinook Back Ramp Weapon Mount with M240D






LRE35167 CH47 Chinook Window Weapon hand made Mount with M240D








LRE 35164 CH47 Chinook Window M134D Minigun mount









LRE35163 CH47 Chinook Door M134D Minigun mount




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  #28  
Old April 13th, 2014, 09:33 PM
Floyd S. Werner, Jr. Floyd S. Werner, Jr. is offline
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Update 12

Sorry it has been a while since I updated. Medical and family issues are the typical detractors. I also had to finish a review build in there, but now Iím back on the build.

I finally got both sides of the fuselage insulated. Overall Iím pretty happy with the results. I finally got the Eduard Photo Etch seats built. I built them too long but didnít figure that out until after I was test fitting. Better now than when they are glued in. I tested my first bit of soldering on the legs. I was happy with the results. I need more practice though.


Here is my second attempt at soldering, a Stokes litter completely scratch built. This was a fun six hour exercise. I learned a lot and will have to do it again. Yes I know it isnít perfect, however, once filled up you canít notice the framework. It just looks cool. Iím doing Razor 1 from Takur Gar and Iím not sure if the Stokes was used or a Skedco. For my model I will have a Stokes litter.




Part of the MH-47Eís cabin area will be occupied with equipment. Here is a load of things I have set up for the model. This was a mild detraction and well spent time. I could not have gotten some of this stuff if it wasnít for some friends on the internet who hooked me up with some of the items or at least pointed me in the right direction.

Some of you will notice the folding chairs. I have a source that says they are used by the gunners. Should be interesting. Iíve learned a lot about this helicopter. Iíll try to point out the things that youíll find cool too. So Iíll have a water cooler, tool box, four folding chairs, water cans, medical bags, back board, Stokes, stretchers (one folded and hanging and the other opened under the Stokes), two storage boxes, a couple of M-4s, four 40mm ammo cans which are used for the extra ammo for the M-134. Speaking of M-134s, Razor 1 did not have the extra battery pack or the extra M-134 can. They used the 40mm cans. While Iím thinking of it, Razor 1 also had an M-60 at the rear windows, not an M-249. Same mounts but different guns. Razor 1 also had a ramp M-60 with spade grips. Iíll make those additions as I go along. That reminds me of yet another point, 475 had a rectangular window on the right side and a round bulged window on the left. I will have to live with my two rectangular windows.



Here are the seats with the seatbelts installed. I opted to make them all the low style, instead of over the shoulder. I did this thinking that operators would have a lot of crap and a shoulder strap would get caught on everything. I started to use the Eduard seatbelts but found that they couldnít be folded realistically enough for me. So I made my own belts out of masking tape. This would have been easier if they werenít a dark green color. Anyhow that was easy enough to handle with some paint. I liked the look of the seats and belts. Now if they will just fit as well as they look.

Left side


Right side


In model building you can replicate or represent when scratchbuilding. In this instance I elected to represent the wiring and tubes. Solder or tubing was used to make the lines. Iím overall happy with the results. Andriyís ramp area will replicate it but I just donít have the time or patience for that.



Here is a close up of the aft end with the caution and warning decals in place. The first aid kits look the part as does the ramp control which is a leftover cyclic. All these decals, plus more, will be available from Wernerís Wings in the Night Stalkers Part 2 decals. These decals were made for me by Joseph Osborn from Fireball Modelworks because I couldnít wait for the new decals. By the way, they will definitely be available at the Nats. If you are building an 1/35th scale Wernerís Wings/Storm Miniatures MH-47E and want to get it done for the Nats, let me know. If I can get you the decals in time I will, but no promises.

Here Iím test fitting the seats to see how they look in place. The tops still need to be folded down an secured in place.


With that you are brought up to date. Iíll start the Live Resin bits soon. I want to finish the right side fuselage plumbing and wiring first. It is coming along and almost ready to join halves. This is getting exciting. I have to make notes for myself so I donít forget to do stuff before I shut up the fuselage. I know a lot of this stuff wonít be seen again but I know its in there and as accurate as I can make it.
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  #29  
Old April 14th, 2014, 09:24 PM
Floyd S. Werner, Jr. Floyd S. Werner, Jr. is offline
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Update 13

Just a quick update. I installed the left side seats. I initially thought this was going to be a pain but it was actually pretty easy. Iím really happy with the seats on this side. Time to work on the other side.



Here you can see how the decals, first aid kits, and hoist control add to the visual interest.


How does it look from the outside? Pretty realistic if you ask me.



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  #30  
Old April 15th, 2014, 03:11 AM
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looking good man..glad to see your still working on it.

Andy
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On the Bench:
Eduard 1/144 Mig 21 MF
Revell 1/32 BF109-G10
Hasegawa 1/200 C-40A Clipper

At some point:
Monogram B-25 turned into a PBJ-1
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  #31  
Old April 16th, 2014, 01:47 AM
Redcrown Redcrown is offline
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Outstanding work Floyd. Do you have any previews of the part 2 Nightstalkers decals yet?

Rick
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  #32  
Old April 16th, 2014, 09:42 PM
Floyd S. Werner, Jr. Floyd S. Werner, Jr. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcrown View Post
Outstanding work Floyd. Do you have any previews of the part 2 Nightstalkers decals yet?

Rick
Not that I can share yet
Floyd
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  #33  
Old July 5th, 2014, 04:02 PM
Floyd S. Werner, Jr. Floyd S. Werner, Jr. is offline
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Update
It was time to start checking out the Live Resin stuff. One of the first things I had to do was re-read the book ďRobertís RidgeĒ which stated the back guns were M-60s and not the M-249 that Live Resin has. It is easy enough to do. I used a Vietnam Weapons set from Dragon which has enough M-60s for the back windows and the ramp gun. The guns are actually pretty phenomenal in plastic. Still the Live Resin would be used to build the mounts. The Live Resin sets are fragile on the smaller parts but a new blade makes quick work of it. The mounts fit perfectly. Superglue was used to join the parts. Simple easy and quick. I learned something, use new superglue. Old superglue may not work as well as desired.




Weathering of the flooring took place now. I used Ammo pigments and washes to do the floor. It was set in place with Pigment fixer. Overall I was pretty happy with the look of the floor. It looks dirty and used. I used dried mud, dark mud, and desert sand. Time to get this baby packed up for the mission.



I started with the left side first because it would have the most equipment on it.

Then I checked with my sources as to what was carried in the back of the cargo bay. A couple of different configurations were discussed. Finally we went with one that was pretty typical. It was not without a little issue. I had installed an additional set of seats forward on the left side. I had to remove it. It was not as big an issue as I thought it would be. Another thing that was discovered was that the floors had straps from the front to the back that operators or equipment can be secured to. I added mine by cutting masking tape and painting it a dark green. You can do dark green, black or off white. Then I drilled holes into the appropriate tiedown points and ran a length of wire through each to replicate the tiedown rings. Then the tape was tied down to the appropriate spots.









The area aft of the forward window was a catch all and the mission equipment. Since my aircraft was going to do the CASEVAC I needed plenty of medical gear. I sourced a bunch from my Wernerís Wings UH-72 and UH-60 Medevac sets. A stretcher was attached to the railing with some masking tape. Marc Rocca was nice enough to provide me with some rucksacks and other items that I could use. The Night Stalkers would hang a rucksack on the overhead railing to take with them if they had to leave the helicopter quickly. I used Meng and Live Resin stuff to fill the area. Much of this will not be seen but I know it will be there. One thing that was essential to a cargo helicopter was the inclusion of cargo straps. I would need some photo etched brass ones from a guy on Armorama. Marc was nice enough to provide me with some rubber gloves that I could use for the cargo straps. The flexible material is perfect for what I needed to do. Some of you will notice that I did not include my Stokes Litter. I couldn't find any place that mentioned a Stokes litter but they did use a Skedco. That was included on the stretcher.




Before I got too far I decided it was a good time to add the radar pod on the left fuselage side. This was actually very easy. I held it in place and drilled three holes to provide some strength. Note that the pod does not join flush on the bottom or the back. Some minor scratch building was done on the bottom of the pod. If you donít do it noone would notice but you.



That is all for now. More to come shortly.
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  #34  
Old July 6th, 2014, 12:20 AM
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Looking great Floyd. I should have pictures/measurements for you soon(ish) still waiting for word back as to when they can accommodate me.

Aaron
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  #35  
Old July 6th, 2014, 02:22 AM
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Excellent work on the interior. I can see that there's a ton more stuff I'm gonna need to get for mine. Good catch in the M-60s. I didn't remember that detail in the book and just figured they were 240s in the back.
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  #36  
Old July 14th, 2014, 10:40 AM
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Awesome job on the interior man. It is coming out pretty good!
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On the Bench:
Eduard 1/144 Mig 21 MF
Revell 1/32 BF109-G10
Hasegawa 1/200 C-40A Clipper

At some point:
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  #37  
Old July 23rd, 2014, 08:27 PM
Floyd S. Werner, Jr. Floyd S. Werner, Jr. is offline
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Update 15
A word of advice- Pin EVERYTHING to the structure to keep it securely fastened while handling. Iíll explain later.

Before I joined the fuselage up I wanted to add the Weather Radar pod. The fit is good. The key is to align the top and keep that flush with the fuselage. The bottom will have a gap as will the aft portion where it fairs around the fuel tank. They are suppose to be there. I drilled though the fuselage in three places within the avionics shelves. This will provide strength and hide the attachment points. I faired my pod in with Apoxy Sculpt and Perfect Putty. There are two attachment points on the bottom of the pod that I scratchbuilt. It is a simple mount. Most will never notice it.




OK it was a moment of truth. I added the stowage and flyaway gear. Cargo was strapped down as in the real thing. How to do this? I used some brass PE buckles from CSM Designs. They are perfect. At first I primed them in the hope to paint themÖ.brass. Duh. So I scraped off the primer and was quite happy with the look of the tiedowns.





The floor was attached to the right side as it had the most seats and would be the hardest to get to plus it had the opening for the heater closet. I learned that the refueling panel was located in the heater closet. See the pictures for where it is located. I used a Cobra Company panel from their aft pylon set. It looked the part and fit perfectly on a sheet of styrene. Another thing that I did was I decided to use flexible ammo chutes from the Cobra Company as the chutes provided by Live Resin were too small to fit from the ammo cans to the breaches of the guns. Besides the chutes have to be heated and molded into place, this was beyond my capability. I was able to maneuver them with a heat gun to get the big curve but without the guns installed there was no way I was going to get them to fit once installed. A hint when using the flexible ammo chutes is to tape the chutes outside the door opening.

The ammo cans are not attached to the floor by straps. They are actually attached to a semi-rectangular piece of aluminum which fits into the tiedowns on the floor. The ammo cans are then strapped to that, maybe a spare ammo can and a water can or two. The MH-47E only had one ammo can per side and no battery boxes. They were powered from the aircraft. The battery box and extra ammo can was added at a later date and to the MH-47G. My aircraft did not have the can and battery box.

One thing that I found out was that the gunners used folding chairs on combat missions. I used the folding chairs from the Tamiya Command Group set. They are old but they look the part. They are held in place by bungee chords. One person has told me that the Task Force aircraft, especially the MH-47s, are Velcro and bungee chorded together.

I was also told that every MH-47 that was deployed had an American flag in the cabin affixed to the roof. I printed one out on paper and glued it in place. Iíve seen them tacked in place and also secured with straps.



I used a very thin strip of blue tape which is not very sticky to hold the left side seats up while I moved the flooring together so as not to break off the legs. Very carefully I moved the fuselage halves together. The fit was troublesome, but not too bad. The fit of my components was actually very good. One of the Live Resin rear guns moved slightly and fouled the fit. It ended up breaking off. It was not the only thing that broke off.

When I turned the model over a few more things broke free, most noticeably the left side ammo can. This required me to completely rip off the passageway and heater closet to reattach it. I ended up leaving out the two water cans as I couldnít figure a way to add them after they broke free. They cannot even be noticed. I actually felt better after parts were put back together.

The fuselage halves were held together with painters tape then glued in place with Tamiya cement and superglue. The fit of the bottom was not as good as I would have liked but certainly not anything too bad. Iíve seen worse. They were filled with superglue and Apoxy Sculpt. Once it was all filled up there was need to rescribe and re-rivet the belly. This was a tedious task but it worked out nicely.

Painterís tape holding it together.


Belly after filling


Re-riveting the belly of the beast


Most MH-47s have Fast Rope attachments in the back of the helicopter. Since I had the helicopter upside down now was the time to scratchbuild it. I used some brass beam and sanded an angle into them. After that I used styrene to build up the mounts and the mounts. Holes were drilled into the model to accept the attachment at any time. I used 90 weight parachute rope for the actual fast ropes. They come in three sizes on the real aircraft, 30, 60 and 90 foot lengths depending on the mission. I was really happy with the results.



I will sell the rope to anyone who wants it. Contact me at fwernerjr@comcast.net . Iíll sell them in scale 60 foot lengths with two per package for $10USD.

It was time to add the landing gear. Now I figured that this would be no problem. Was I wrong. The forward gear seems to be made from a very strong white metal. That canít be said for the aft landing gear or the lower part of the forward gear. They are fragile and literally fall apart. I am lucky that I had two D model kits because I needed both of them. Even then some I had to be glued to hold in place. Overall they went together fine after a breakage here and there. I sure wish Scale Aircraft Conversions would come out with a set that wouldnít fall apart.

I used Cobra Companyís wheels and brake cylinders as they are nicer and easier to use than the kit vinyl ones.

Front landing gear after being modified and pinned in place.


It was time to add the back portion of the fuel tanks. These are easy to add and fair in. I did paint the area behind and under them as they would be difficult to get to later.

That is all with this update. More to follow as I can get to it. Next iteration, the cockpit and canopy.
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  #38  
Old July 23rd, 2014, 09:26 PM
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Looking great Floyd. Too bad about the ammo chutes. I wish cobra company would sell the chutes by themselves. Last time I had to buy a whole weapon set just for the chutes.
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  #39  
Old July 30th, 2014, 04:10 PM
Floyd S. Werner, Jr. Floyd S. Werner, Jr. is offline
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Update 16

Now that the model had wheels it was time to add the cockpit/canopy area. Before that can happen I had to Ďexperimentí with the canopy. I polished the cockpit windscreens inside and out with MicroMesh. Then they were sprayed with Future. I couldnít get my Future to work. It was obviously my fault as another modeler, Dave Hoernle, had no issue after he polished his. I used Mr. Super Gloss Clear. It worked out just as well as Future for me. I was told by the caster that if you sand the canopy with 800 or 1000 grit sandpaper that the Future would work as well. So it is your call on what you use. Either one works and it makes the windows clearer.



Once dried the interior was masked off and then painted on the inside. I used Lifecolor Deep Cockpit to paint the basic interior. The rest was painted with Applebarrel and Vallejo paints to pick out the details. DONíT FORGET TO REMOVE THE INTERIOR MASKS PRIOR TO CLOSING UP THE CANOPY. More on that later.





Some research showed that the combat aircraft carried armored side panels in the lower portion of the door outside the seat and one smaller panel in the lower chin bubble. I did both of these with styrene. The are grey in the pictures I have so I painted mine Tamiya Neutral Grey. The larger side panel has stenciling on it. How do you replicate that? Well Iím glad you asked. The new Wernerís Wings Night Stalker-Part II sheet has them and some other interior markings for the Chinook. They look great and fit perfectly. Thanks again to Mason Doupnik. I added these panels with a tiny drop of superglue. Luckily it didnít fog the area.

See anything wrong with this picture?






I added the glare shield to the interior. While I was at it I also added some photo etch power levers to the overhead panel. You will probably not even notice them but I know they are there.


Time to bring the front together, I added the cockpit to the front of the model with five minute epoxy. It just has to butt join the rear of the opening. After it dried, I checked the fit of the clear nose piece. The fit was surprisingly good. It did need some sanding here and there. I did add a piece of plastic to the one side. The clear canopy was added with five minute epoxy. The canopy was held in place with tape and fingers until it set up. Then any resulting gaps were filled with Apoxy Sculpt and Perfect Plastic Putty faired in the canopy.


I primed the area with Tamiya flat black which would be seen on the inside of the canopy. This was followed up with Alclad Grey primer. There were a few areas that needed to be touched up, but nothing too drastic. These were taken care of and then the area was retouched up. Some scribing had to take place as well as some riveting. Iíll wait on the rivets until Iím done with the model just prior to priming.


Overall I was happy with the resulting canopy to fuselage join. Even with a kit canopy you would still have to fill lots of seams so I was pretty happy with the aftermarket canopy. Now onto other things.
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Old July 31st, 2014, 02:14 PM
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Winnie Winnie is offline
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veryy awesome build. I just have to build skill so I can tackle that monster.!
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